Imprimer

227 - Le microbiote animal : une question d'équilibre!

Du mercredi 8 au jeudi 9 mai 2013

Le microbiote intestinal - mieux connu sous le nom de flore intestinale - est estimé à plus de 100 mille milliards de bactéries, soit dix fois plus que nos propres cellules humaines. Il est de plus en plus reconnu comme un organe à part entière car il est un acteur important de la santé animale. Comme l’ensemble de nos organes, le microbiote intestinal est fonctionnellement dynamique et capable de s’adapter aux différents facteurs environnementaux de l’écosystème intestinal. Il est une barrière contre les infections, il aide au développement et à la maturation du système immunitaire et il contribue à l’extraction des nutriments et de l’énergie des aliments consommés.

 

Parmi les facteurs à la fois biotiques et abiotiques qui influent sur le microbiote, l’alimentation joue un rôle majeur et peut modifier directement ou indirectement l’environnement gastro-intestinal tout autant que les antibiotiques donnés pour traiter une infection bactérienne. Des déséquilibres au sein de cet écosystème fragile ont même été démontrés dans de nombreuses pathologies. La nutrition aurait donc un rôle important sur la réponse immunitaire face aux maladies infectieuses et sur la composition du microbiote. La perspective d’une maîtrise et d’une orientation de la flore intestinale vers une meilleure efficacité permettrait de mieux valoriser les ressources alimentaires mondiales et assurerait une meilleure rentabilité économique des systèmes d’élevage.

Lire la suite »
Colloque
Section 200 - Sciences naturelles, mathématiques et génie
Responsables
UdeM - Université de Montréal
UdeM - Université de Montréal
Ajouter à mon horaire
Afficher tous les résumés
Avant-midi
09 h 30 à 12 h 00
Communications orales
Microbiote intestinal porcin
Présidence/Animation : Philippe Fravalo (UdeM - Université de Montréal)
09 h 30
Programme partiel du colloque 227 : chaque conférence donnée par un chercheur sera suivie d'une conférence de 15 minutes d'un étudiant membre du CRIP.Consulter le site Web du CRIP.
Josée Harel (UdeM - Université de Montréal)
09 h 45
Mot de bienvenue au colloque 227 - Le microbiote animal : une question d'équuilibre!
Philippe Fravalo (UdeM - Université de Montréal)

Accueil des participants, et courte présenation du Colloque et du CRIP.

Résumé
10 h 00
Les communautés bactériennes dans l'intestin des porcs : effet de l'âge, des antibiotiques et des infections sur la composition de la flore
Richard Isaacson (University of Minnesota)

The microbiome in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals is important for their health and well-being. As animals grow and mature, the microbiome composition changes to accommodate structural and physiological changes in the animal. We studied the role that the microbiome plays in pigs and how it changes over time. The work to be presented will cover microbial shifts over time, effects of antimicrobials on flora composition, and the effects of infections on microbiome changes and how these changes may lead to increased shedding of the food borne pathogen Salmonella enterica. Our work supports the concept that succession in microbial composition does occur during the post-weaning period and continues to maturity. Important tools used in pig production include growth promoting antibiotics. These antibiotics appear to increase the rate of microbiome maturation and this could explain how antibiotic growth promoters improve feed conversion. However, their use also can increase resistance to antimicrobials, which is a public health concern. Another function ascribed to the gut microbiome is competitive exclusion of pathogens. We show that infection of pigs with S. enterica alters the composition of the gut microbiome. Moreover, dual infection of pigs with S. enterica and Lawsonia intracellularis results in increased shedding of S. enterica and also in added changes to the gut microbiome. Thus, changes in the gut microbiomes of food animals also could have significant public health effects.

Résumé
10 h 40
Période de questions
11 h 00
Profilage haute-resolution du microbiote intestinal du porc
Janet Hill (University of Saskatchewan)

The complex community of microorganisms comprising the intestinal microbiota of pigs and other animals plays an essential role in host development, immune regulation, nutrition, and protection from infection. During a pig's development, the microbiota undergoes succession to reach the "climax community" of the adult: a process that can be disrupted by interventions such as weaning, medication, or infection, with potentially serious consequences to the animal's health. A comprehensive understanding of the ecology of this environment, and its potential modification to improve health and performance, requires knowledge of both the structure and function of the community. While technological advances in various "-omics" fields have offered new perspectives on the activity of microorganisms, there have been fewer advances in our ability to generate high resolution, representative, taxonomic profiles of the microbiota. The gene encoding the universal 60 kDa chaperonin (CPN60, also known as GroEL or HSP60) has recently been demonstrated to provide a preferred sequence barcode for bacteria, permitting new approaches to taxonomic profiling of microbial communities and enhancing discovery of novel organisms. We are currently exploiting these approaches in studying succession in the gut microbiota of growing pigs and in investigating the role of the microbiota in determining susceptibility to Brachyspira infection.

Résumé
12 h 00
Dîner
Après-midi
13 h 30 à 15 h 30
Communications orales
Microbiotes non-intestinaux chez les animaux d'élevage
Présidence/Animation : Martine Boulianne (UdeM - Université de Montréal)
13 h 30
Le microbiome des tonsils du palais mou du porc
Janet MacInnes (Université de Guelph), Shaun KERNAGHAN (Université de Guelph)

The tonsil of the soft palate in pigs is a secondary lymphoid tissue that provides a first line of defense against foreign antigens entering by the mouth or nares, but paradoxically, it is also the site of colonization and entry of many bacterial and viral pathogens. Our initial understanding of a limited number of specific microbes present at this site came from culture-based studies.  Recently, however, 16S rRNA gene based studies have revealed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes predominate this site with Actinobacillus, Alkanindiges, Fusobacterium, Haemophilus, Pasteurella, Veillonella, Peptostreptococcus, and Streptococcus making up the majority of reads. In our current studies using T-RFLP analysis, the tonsil microbiome of 128 pigs was evaluated using samples obtained mainly from diseased animals. although it was difficult to obtain unambiguous identification at the genus and species level, it was possible to confirm the predominance of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and to detect animal to animal differences. Representative samples for pyrosequencing revealed 151 genera across 9 phyla. In contrast to previous 16S rRNA gene studies, the most prevalent genera were Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Porphyromonas, and Streptococcus. Significant associations were found with community structure and the presence of anemia, abscess, PRRS virus, and Mycoplasma. In the futur, it should be possible to manipulate the microbiome of the tonsil to promote health and reduce disease.

Résumé
14 h 30
Utilisation de levures probiotiques pour  optimiser la stabilité et la fonction du microbiote du rumen : mode d'action et effets sur la santé  et les performances animales
Evelyne Forano (INRA - Institut national de recherche agronomique)

a venir

Résumé
15 h 30
Pause
15 h 45 à 16 h 30
Communications orales
Microbiote session 3
Présidence/Animation : Ann Letellier (UdeM - Université de Montréal)
15 h 45
Influence du taux de croissance, des probiotiques, des nutraceutiques et des aliments fonctionnels sur le microbiote intestinal des procelets allaités et sevrés
Guylaine Talbot (Agriculture et agroalimentaire Canada), Martin Lessard (Centre de recherche et de développement sur le bovin laitier et le porc, AAFC)

Litter size significantly increased in swine production during the last 20 years and created two problems: 1) increased heterogeneity of piglet growth and development within litter and 2) inadequate supply of nutrients to sustain optimal growth of piglets. Smaller piglets have poorer growth rate and are more prone to intestinal disorders and disease than bigger ones. We are then exploring the gut microbiome of low versus high weight suckling piglets, in order to identify bacterial populations associated with weight gain and intestinal health. In our approach for improvement of weanling piglets' health by minimizing the incidence of intestinal disorders and the use of antibiotics as growth promoters, we are studying combinations of functional molecules for their modulatory properties on the gut microbiome. These molecules, provided to weanling piglets as feed supplements, consist in micronutrients and functional food: cranberry extract, essential oil, colostrum, yeast-derived prebiotics, probiotics, vitamins (A, D and B complex) and organic selenium. We have compared groups of weanling piglets that received the supplemented diets with groups on conventional diet with and without prophylactic antibiotics to determine dietary effects on the gut microbiome and on particular bacterial groups. Several beneficial bacteria associated with particular intestinal sites were identified and increased our understanding of the influence of micronutrients and functional food on intestinal health.

Résumé
16 h 30 à 19 h 00
Communications par affiches
Cocktail : maillage d'affaire et Compétition des affiches du Colloque 227 et du 6e Symposium du CRIPA
Afficher tous les résumés
Avant-midi
08 h 00 à 10 h 00
Communications orales
6e Symposium du CRIPA
08 h 00
Mot de bienvenue
08 h 15
Accueil des participants au 6e Symposium du CRIP
Josée Harel (UdeM - Université de Montréal)
09 h 00
Détermination de la structure de la capsule de Streptococcus suis type 14
Marie-Rose Van Calsteren (Agriculture et agroalimentaire Canada), Mariela SEGURA (UdeM - Université de Montréal), Marcelo GOTTSCHALK (UdeM - Université de Montréal), Nahuel FITTIPALDI

Malgré la thérapie antimicrobienne améliorée, les infections humaines et animales avec les bactéries encapsulées continuent à causer de graves problèmes cliniques et économiques. Le polysaccharide capsulaire (CPS) joue un rôle majeur dans la survie des bactéries pathogènes et leurs dissémination dans l'hôte. Le CPS masque des protéines antigéniques sur la surface bactérienne, permettant ainsi l'évasion bactérienne du système immunitaire hôte. Paradoxalement, on considère que des anticorps contre le CPS bactérien sont des éléments essentiels pour ériger la protection de l'hôte et ont servis de base à plusieurs vaccins conjugués efficaces. Streptococcus suis est un pathogène important en industrie porcine et le serotype 2 est responsable d'épisodes récents de zoonose. Ainsi S. suis type 2 a causé des méningites chez des adultes dans quelques pays asiatiques. Outre le serotype 2, le sérotype 14 est aussi considéré comme une menace humaine sérieuse. Le type capsulaire 14 a été fréquement isolé de porcs malade au Québec et un cas humain a été rapporté au Canada en 2009. L'importance de CPS comme un facteur de virulence critique pour S. suis type 2 a été démontré de façon concluante . Cependant, la contribution de CPS à la virulence d'autres types capsulaires n'a jamais été évaluée. C'est pourquoi nous avons déterminé la structure du CPS de type 14.

Résumé
10 h 00
Pause
10 h 30 à 12 h 30
Communications orales
6e Symposium du CRIPA axe de recherche 2
12 h 15
Lauréats des prix du CRIP
Josée Harel (UdeM - Université de Montréal)
12 h 30
Dîner
Après-midi
14 h 00 à 17 h 00
Panel
Réunion des membres du CRIPA
14 h 00 à 17 h 00
Panel
Atelier de formation étudiant et professionnel de recherche